Samuel Brozina Millville NJ
Samuel Brozina

Samuel Brozina Shares His Background Volunteering as a Revolutionary War Reenactor

Licensed pilot Samuel Brozina offers a personal insight into his time spent as a volunteer Revolutionary War reenactor.

 

For a number of years, Samuel Brozina spent considerable time volunteering as a Revolutionary War reenactor. From being able to explain what it was like to have lived back in time, to learning all there is to know about a given role or persona, Brozina reveals what it takes to be a successful volunteer reenactor and why he loved the process so much.

 

“I found it a personally rewarding experience and would recommend the hobby to anyone interested in learning about history,” reveals Brozina, a licensed pilot from Millville, New Jersey. There are, he says, few better ways to learn than by spending hours in the shoes of someone who actually lived in the past.

 

According to Brozina, the hobby is attractive to persons of all ages, from children to seniors. “Anyone willing to imagine themselves transported back in time could be a volunteer Revolutionary War reenactor,” he suggests. 

 

Reenactors take their roles very seriously, and Sam, he says, was no exception. “The hobby can become somewhat expensive as uniforms and equipment are expected to be authentic,” explains Brozina, “both in appearance and appropriate to the character of a person who lived in a bygone era.” 

 

The physical requirements, however, are, according to the expert, rather more simple. “As long as a person is in good health and able to perform a level of physical activity, they should be able to find a role,” Brozina explains. “You could take the role of an actual historical individual,” he adds, “or a more general persona such as a nameless farmer who joined a militia or a private serving in the Continental Army or the Pennsylvania Line, for example.” 

 

Born and raised in Millville, New Jersey, Samuel Brozina, a licensed pilot, is the proud owner of a rare ERCO Ercoupe aircraft. The pilot is also passionate about traditional art, and, in particular, the process of dyeing Ukrainian Easter eggs. “It’s both a relaxing hobby,” Brozina suggests, “as well as drawing me closer to the roots of the Ukrainian side of my family.”

 

Brozina has previously spoken at length about his love of traditional Ukrainian Easter egg dyeing while showcasing his broad range of hobbies and interests, as well as looking back on the history of aerospace and defense manufacturer ERCO in light of landing his own ERCO Ercoupe airplane.

 

“I believe that maintaining a number of hobbies and interests is important,” he adds, wrapping up, “and look forward to possibly revisiting my love of war reenactment once again when time permits.”

 

To learn more about former Revolutionary War reenactor, licensed pilot, and traditional Ukrainian Easter egg dyeing aficionado Samuel Brozina, from Millville, New Jersey, visit https://samuelbrozinamillvillenj.com/.

Samuel Brozina

Samuel Brozina Demonstrates Favorite Easter Tradition

Licensed pilot and hobby artist Samuel Brozina reveals his favorite Easter tradition.

 

An active member of his local church, Samuel Brozina is proud to continue a tradition today enjoyed by fewer and fewer church members – Ukrainian Easter egg dyeing. A qualified pilot and landscaping service foreman from Millville, New Jersey, Brozina provides a closer look at the tradition of preparing Ukrainian Easter eggs.

 

“As a member of my local Ukrainian Orthodox church, I’m proud to be continuing the ancient art of traditional Easter egg dyeing,” explains Brozina, an active member of Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Millville, New Jersey. 

 

At Easter, he and his father, to this day, continue to honor the tradition of preparing Ukrainian Easter eggs. “Each traditional Ukrainian Easter egg, or pysanka, is decorated with traditional Ukrainian folk designs,” says Brozina. Pysanka, he explains, are created by drawing—in wax—directly upon an egg’s shell with a special tool.

 

“When the egg is dipped in a bath of dye, the areas covered by wax do not absorb the color,” reveals the Easter egg dyeing aficionado. “At the end of several steps of drawing and dyeing, and drawing and dyeing, the wax is melted off to show the design underneath,” he adds. 

 

The eggs, and other traditional items, are then included in Easter baskets which are delivered to church—in Samuel Brozina’s case, Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Millville, New Jersey—to be blessed.

 

“My father and I have been dyeing these eggs since I was a small boy, and although a few may have been dropped and broken when I was little, I’ve since developed a steady hand as well as the necessary patience required to make a fine finished product,” Samuel explains.  

 

While Sam says his father sticks with more traditional designs, he likes to let his creativity flow, and, accordingly, many of his eggs represent his own personal tastes. “Making these eggs is a relaxing hobby and draws me closer to the roots of the Ukrainian side of my family,” reveals Brozina. 

 

“Today, fewer and fewer church members take the time to make pysanka,” he adds, wrapping up, “so my family and friends, proud of my efforts, are pleased to see the tradition continue for years to come.”

 

To learn more about licensed pilot, landscaping service foreman, and traditional Ukrainian Easter egg dyeing aficionado Samuel Brozina, from Millville, New Jersey, head to https://samuelbrozinamillvillenj.com/.

Samuel Brozina

Samuel Brozina Reflects on Recent Acquisition of ERCO Ercoupe Aircraft

Lifelong aviation fan and licensed pilot Samuel Brozina looks back on his recent purchase of a rare classic aircraft. 

 

Now out of production for close to half a century, the Engineering and Research Corporation’s classic low-wing monoplane aircraft—the Ercoupe—is, today, an increasingly rare sight both in the skies and on the nation’s airfields. A lifelong fan of aviation, licensed pilot Samuel Brozina takes a brief look back on the purchase of his own Ercoupe, acquired recently from a seller less than 100 miles from his home in Millville, New Jersey.

 

“Even now, a while later, I still consider myself to be extremely lucky,” beams Brozina, a self-proclaimed fan of so-called World War II warbirds. 

 

Among civilian aircraft, however, it’s always been the Ercoupe that has caught Samuel’s eye. “Drive by any small airport, and you’re bound to see any number of Cessnas, Pipers, and Beechcrafts,” suggests the licensed pilot, hobby artist, and landscaping service foreman, “but you probably won’t see any Ercoupes.” 

 

Built in the United States until 1970, the Ercoupe is a low-wing monoplane aircraft which was designed by the Engineering and Research Corporation, or ERCO. “The final model first flew in 1968, but unfortunately, production then ceased just two short years later,” adds the expert. 

 

At launch, the ERCO Ercoupe was marketed as ‘the future of travel,’ according to Millville resident and New Jersey native Brozina. “Affordable, easily handled, and readily available for purchase, it became a media sensation,” he explains. 

 

Immensely popular with civilian pilots of the era, the Ercoupe was attracting up to 6,000 orders per year at its height. “Production, I believe, only ended when the bottom began to fall out of the civil aircraft market,” adds Brozina. 

 

Today, only around 2,000 Ercoupes survive, with fewer than 1,000 of those still registered to fly. “With such a small number still in existence, I feel even more lucky to be the proud owner of my own Ercoupe,” suggests an undeniably enthusiastic Brozina, who acquired his private pilot’s license several years ago. 

 

Samuel Brozina’s own Ercoupe came from Quakertown, Pennsylvania, around 50 miles north of Philadelphia and less than 100 miles from his hometown of Millville, New Jersey. “I was amazed to find one so close by,” he reveals. 

 

Since collecting his purchase, enthusiast Brozina has even commissioned a unique Ercoupe jacket patch. “Now,” he adds, wrapping up, “I’m always ready for takeoff!”

Samuel Brozina Looks Back on History of Eerospace and Defense Manufacturer Engineering and Research Corporation

Licensed Pilot and Ercoupe Owner Samuel Brozina Shares a Brief History of Former Aerospace and Defense Manufacturer Engineering and Research Corporation, or ERCO

Founded almost 90 years ago, Engineering and Research Corporation, more commonly known as ERCO, was an aerospace and defense manufacturer famed for designing the ERCO Ercoupe, a low-wing monoplane aircraft beloved by vintage aviation enthusiasts including Samuel Brozina. A licensed pilot, New Jersey native, and graduate of Cumberland County College in Vineland, NJ, Brozina looks back on the history of ERCO, first established to produce tools for manufacturing aircraft, parts, and propellers.

“The company was started by Henry Berliner in 1930,” explains Samuel. Henry was, he says, the son of Emile Berliner. Emile Berliner had, previously, patented a variety of inventions tied to acoustics and sound. He was also a pioneer of modern helicopter innovation and development, responsible for the experimental Berliner Helicopter, according to aviation enthusiast Samuel Brozina.

“Henry Berliner originally founded ERCO to make tools for the production of airplanes, propellers, and other parts,” adds Samuel Brozina. “Berliner soon met aeronautical engineer Fred Weick,” he explains, “who had previously worked on an experimental aircraft with an emphasis on cutting edge safety features.”

The pair subsequently began work on what would come to be known as the ERCO Ercoupe. A lifelong aviation enthusiast, Samuel Brozina, from Millville, NJ, is a particular fan of the ERCO Ercoupe, owning one of fewer than a thousand examples of the low-wing monoplane aircraft still registered to fly in America. “The Ercoupe was designed and built by ERCO until shortly before World War II,” adds the expert, “following which several other manufacturers went on to continue its production, post-war.”

“Alongside Berliner, Fred Weick, in the early days, called it his ‘safety airplane,'” reveals Brozina, “and just one year after work started, a prototype Ercoupe took to the skies for the first time.”

Struggling to source a suitable engine to power the new airplane, ERCO hired specialist engine design engineer Harold Morehouse. “What he designed,” says Samuel, “was the inverted, in-line I-L 116.”

A year later, however, and with affordability a priority, second only to safety, ERCO discovered a more cost-effective option in the all-new Continental A-65 engine. “The A-65 generated similar horsepower,” Samuel Brozina explains, “but for around half the cost.”

The finished product was certified by the Civil Aviation Authority in 1940. Yet, in 1947, the designs, parts, tools, materials, and distribution rights for the aircraft were sold to Sanders Aviation, who continued to produce the Ercoupe post-World War II, independently of Berliner, Weick, and their team.

“In total, ERCO and Sanders Aviation successfully manufactured and sold slightly more than 5,000 Ercoupes,” adds Brozina, wrapping up, “before the small aircraft market in the U.S. began to fall into decline.”

To learn more about Millville resident and NJ native Samuel Brozina, visit https://samuelbrozinamillvillenj.com/.

Samuel Brozina Explains Odyssey of The Mind

Millville Senior High School graduate and former OotM team member Samuel Brozina offers a closer look at the creative problem-solving program.

A creative problem-solving program for students from kindergarten through college, Odyssey of the Mind sees team members work together to solve predefined long-term problems before presenting their solutions in a competition environment. Now a licensed pilot who, as a student, was involved in Odyssey of the Mind while studying at Millville Senior High School in Millville, New Jersey, Samuel Brozina explains more about the program, often abbreviated to OotM.

“The Odyssey of the Mind program was founded in 1978 at Glassboro State College in Glassboro, New Jersey,” reveals Brozina. The program’s first-ever competition, then known as Olympics of the Mind, involved students from 28 New Jersey schools, according to Samuel.

Odyssey of the Mind has since grown to include students from dozens of countries including Australia, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. “Odyssey of the Mind teams are primarily split into four divisions,” explains Brozina, “known as Division I through Division IV.”

“In Division IV,” he continues, “each team member must have a high school diploma or equivalent, and be enrolled in one or more courses at either a two- or four-year university or college.”

A fifth non-competitive primary division also exists where students are given simplified problems and fewer constraints than in the higher divisions, according to Brozina. “Team sizes are always limited to a maximum of seven students,” adds the former Odyssey of the Mind team member.

The Odyssey of the Mind World Finals are held annually, usually at the end of May. “The past eight finals have each been won by either Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa, or Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan,” Brozina reveals. Iowa State University took the title in 2018, 2016, 2014, and 2012, while Michigan State University was triumphant this year and in 2017, 2015, and 2013.

Samuel Brozina, from Millville, New Jersey, is a graduate of Millville Senior High School, a comprehensive community public high school located in Cumberland County, New Jersey. In addition to his involvement with Odyssey of the Mind, Brozina also served alongside teachers and administrators on the school’s leadership council, charged with planning and implementing various school improvement projects.

“Following my time at Millville Senior High School where I was involved with Odyssey of the Mind, I attended nearby Cumberland County College where I earned a degree in criminal justice,” reveals Brozina.

“I’ve since gone on,” he adds, wrapping up, “to acquire my private pilot’s license and have recently purchased my own airplane, a vintage ERCO Ercoupe, from a seller in Pennsylvania.”

To learn more about Samuel Brozina, visit https://samuelbrozinamillvillenj.com/.

Samuel Brozina Showcases Broad Range of Hobbies And Interests

Aviation enthusiast, choir singer, and hobby artist Samuel Brozina shares a personal insight into his interests.

From piloting his own vintage aircraft to singing in his church’s choir, landscaping service foreman Samuel Brozina’s wide range of hobbies and interests also includes the traditional art of Ukrainian Easter egg dying. A licensed pilot from Millville, New Jersey native Brozina offers a closer look at his passions.

“I’ve always been a huge fan of aviation,” reveals Brozina, pointing toward his love of flying. A particular fan of World War II warbirds, among civilian aircraft, however, his favorite plane, he says, has always been the ERCO Ercoupe. Subsequently, Brozina has gone on not only to become a licensed pilot, but also to become the proud owner of his own Ercoupe, one of only an estimated 1,000 in the United States still registered to fly.

Flying and aviation, however, is, perhaps, not quite Brozina’s most long-standing interest. “As a young child, I was introduced to the traditional art of Ukrainian Easter egg dying,” explains the New Jersey landscaping service foreman.

In the years since, Brozina has maintained a passion for the art form, something which he says brings him closer to the roots of the Ukrainian side of his family. “It’s also been a wonderful process for learning patience and developing a steady hand,” he explains.

Typically completed using a wax-resist method, Ukrainian Easter egg dying remains a love of both Samuel and his family alike. “Myself and my father, in particular, continue to thoroughly enjoy the process and both complete a number of eggs each year,” adds the licensed pilot and hobby artist.

Historically, Ukrainian dyed Easter eggs and other traditional items have been included in Easter baskets each year which are then delivered to a local church to be blessed. “I’m an active member of my church,” adds Brozina of another of his interests, “where I sing bass in the choir as one of my other hobbies.”

Samuel Brozina, from Millville, New Jersey, is a graduate of Millville Senior High School, a comprehensive community public high school located in Cumberland County, New Jersey. It was here that he would, as a child, become active in band and OotM, a creative problem-solving program involving students from kindergarten through college.

“As a student, I also served with teachers and administrators on the school’s leadership council which was charged with planning and implementing school improvement projects,” explains Brozina.

Following further studies at Cumberland County College, a nearby public community college, situated in Vineland, where he earned a degree in criminal justice, Samuel Brozina went on to work in store security for a time.

Briefly turning his focus back to his hobbies, pilot, artist, and choir singer Brozina also reveals details of a previous passion of his. “For several years I was also a keen Revolutionary War reenactor in my spare time,” he adds, wrapping up, “and still maintain a strong love of history in general today.”

Samuel Brozina

Samuel Brozina Continues to Embrace Love of Traditional Ukrainian Easter Egg Dyeing

New Jersey landscaping service foreman Samuel Brozina offers a closer look at his passion for dyeing traditional Ukrainian Easter eggs each year.

From bringing him closer to his Ukrainian roots to learning patience and maintaining a steady hand, Samuel Brozina has enjoyed the traditional art of dyeing Ukrainian Easter eggs since childhood. Now a local landscaping service foreman and licensed pilot from New Jersey, Brozina shares details of the traditional Easter egg dyeing process, typically completed using a wax-resist method.

“Dying Ukrainian Easter eggs is both a relaxing hobby and an excellent creative outlet,” suggests New Jersey native Brozina. He has, he says, spent years refining his Easter egg dyeing skills, and continues to embrace the joys of the process. “It remains an Easter tradition,” he adds, “and is something which my father and I continue to thoroughly enjoy every year.”

According to experts, the wax-resist method of egg decoration used in traditional Ukrainian Easter egg dyeing likely dates back to the pre-Christian era. “Dyed Easter eggs are known in Ukraine as pysanka, which comes from the verb pysaty, meaning ‘to write’ or ‘to inscribe,’ and designs are indeed written or inscribed on to the eggs, rather than being simply painted,” explains Brozina.

For Samuel and his family, the process remains an annual Easter tradition, with his father, in particular, also passionate about the traditional art form. Ukrainian Easter eggs are, he says, a staple in Ukrainian Easter baskets which are often blessed at local churches. “The hobby of dyeing Easter eggs, I believe, draws me closer to the roots of the Ukrainian side of my family,” adds the hobby artist and licensed pilot.

Among his family, Samuel Brozina is known for his creatively decorated Ukrainian Easter eggs. “My father, for example, largely sticks with more traditional designs,” he reveals, “while I like to let my creativity flow.”

Many of his finished eggs, he suggests, represent his own personal tastes.

In addition to his passion for art, Millville Senior High School graduate Samuel Brozina is also a licensed pilot and the proud owner of an ERCO Ercoupe low-wing monoplane aircraft. A lifelong aviation enthusiast, he recently acquired the rare American designed and built civilian aircraft from a seller in Quakertown, Pennsylvania, less than 100 miles from his home in Millville, New Jersey.

“I’m also an active member of my church,” he adds, wrapping up, “where I sing bass in the choir.”

Samuel Brozina

Samuel Brozina Lands Himself Rare Classic Aaircraft

Licensed pilot Samuel Brozina secures rare ERCO Ercoupe from Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

One of only around 1,000 ERCO Ercoupe aircraft still registered to fly, pilot and landscaping service foreman Samuel Brozina has landed himself something of a rare find, recently scooping up a good example of the low-wing monoplane aircraft from a seller in Quakertown, Pennsylvania. A particular fan of World War II warbirds, Brozina explains why, among civilian aircraft, the Ercoupe has always taken his fancy.

“Pass by any small airport and you’re bound to see numerous Pipers, Cessnas, and Beechcrafts, but you’re unlikely to see any Ercoupes,” suggests Brozina, a landscaping service foreman and licensed pilot from Millville, New Jersey.

Out of production for almost 50 years, the ERCO Ercoupe is today a rare find among American designed and built aircraft according to the aviation enthusiast and expert. Brozina is one of the very latest individuals to get their hands on an example of the now-much-sought-after postwar civilian aircraft, with fewer than 1,000 still registered to fly.

“It’s believed that fewer than 2,000 of the aircraft still exist,” explains the New Jersey native and Millville resident, “with less than half of those actually still registered to fly, sadly.”

The ERCO Ercoupe, says Brozina, remains relatively unknown, even among today’s pilots and aircraft enthusiasts.

Despite immense early popularity thanks to its affordability, sold by department stores and built in the United States until 1970, the Ercoupe was designed by the Engineering and Research Corporation, or ERCO. “It was first manufactured by ERCO shortly before World War II, following which several other companies continued its production,” reveals the expert. The final model, he goes on to point out, first flew in 1968 before production ceased two years later in 1970.

“Production of the plane, I believe, only ended when the bottom began to drop out of the civil aircraft market,” suggests the Ercoupe aficionado.

With such a small number still in existence, Brozina reckons that the Ercoupe—a one-time media sensation attracting more than 6,000 orders per year during the height of its popularity—is beginning to gain something of a cult following among a new generation of pilots and aviation fans.

A lifelong aviation enthusiast, Samuel Brozina was lucky enough to scoop his own ERCO Ercoupe from a seller in the Bucks County borough of Quakertown, Pennsylvania, less than 100 miles from his home in Millville, New Jersey. “I consider myself extremely lucky,” he beams.

Since acquiring his new aircraft, Brozina has even commissioned a specially designed and manufactured, one-of-a-kind Ercoupe jacket patch. “Jacket patches and proud pilots go hand-in-hand together, and I’m no exception,” he adds, wrapping up.

Samuel Brozina Reveals Passion for Traditional Art

Amateur artist and qualified pilot Samuel Brozina offers a personal insight into his love of dyeing Ukrainian Easter eggs.

Requiring patience and a steady hand, Samuel Brozina credits his passion for dyeing traditional Ukrainian Easter eggs with bringing him closer to his Ukrainian family roots. A traditional hobby enjoyed annually by the amateur artist and his father, Brozina offers a personal insight into his love of the artistic pastime and its history.

“I consider it to be both a relaxing pastime and an excellent creative outlet,” suggests the hobby artist, licensed pilot, and landscaping service foreman from Millville, New Jersey. He has, he says, spent years refining his egg dyeing skills.

Ukrainian Easter eggs, or pysanka, Brozina explains, are eggs adorned with traditional folk designs, achieved by employing what’s known as a wax-resist method within art. “Pysaty, which means ‘to write’ or ‘to inscribe,’ refers to the way in which the designs are written or inscribed with beeswax, rather than being simply painted on,” adds the expert.

An Easter tradition for Samuel and his family, the Brozinas have enjoyed the hobby since the now-qualified pilot was a young boy. “While my father still tends to stick with more traditional designs, I like to explore my creativity, and many of my eggs represent my personal tastes,” he explains.

“Dyeing Ukrainian Easter eggs, I believe,” Brozina continues, “also draws me closer to the roots of the Ukrainian side of my family.”

The traditional technique, he says, calls for a variety of supplies and special tools. “After several steps of inscribing and dyeing, the finished design is finally revealed,” adds the egg dyeing expert.

Samuel Brozina, from Millville, New Jersey, is a graduate of Millville Senior High School, a comprehensive community public high school located in Cumberland County, New Jersey, and Cumberland County College, a nearby public community college, situated in Vineland.

In addition to his hobby of dyeing Ukrainian Easter eggs, Brozina has long harbored a love of aviation. “I’ve always loved flight and airplanes,” he explains. This has subsequently led him to earn his private pilot license, and, recently, to become the proud owner of an ERCO Ercoupe low-wing monoplane aircraft.

A rare find among American designed and built aircraft, and now out of production for almost half a century, the ERCO Ercoupe was initially marketed as the airplane which anyone could fly. Samuel Brozina’s recent acquisition came from Quakertown, Pennsylvania. “I was able to find a good example for sale in Quakertown,” he explains, “around 50 miles outside of Philadelphia.”

“I’m also an active member of my church choir where I sing bass,” adds Samuel Brozina, wrapping up, “and, for several years, was a keen Revolutionary War reenactor.”

Samuel Brozina Becomes Proud Owner of ERCO Ercoupe

 Licensed pilot Samuel Brozina discusses becoming the proud owner of an ERCO Ercoupe low-wing monoplane aircraft.

A rare find among American designed and built aircraft, and now out of production for almost 50 years, the ERCO Ercoupe was originally marketed as the airplane which anyone could fly. With Samuel Brozina one of the latest individuals to get their hands on an example of this much sought-after postwar super-success, the licensed pilot, hobby artist, and landscaping service foreman from Millville, New Jersey, reveals more about the airplane and his own purchase.

“Drive by any small airport and you’re bound to see any number of Cessnas, Pipers, and Beechcrafts,” suggests Brozina, “but you probably won’t see any Ercoupes.”

According to Samuel Brozina, it’s not your usual airplane. “I sometimes call it my ‘What-is-it?’ as this is the question which I’m asked most frequently,” he jokes.

The Ercoupe is a low-wing monoplane aircraft which was designed-by the Engineering and Research Corporation, or ERCO-and built in the United States until 1970. “It was first manufactured by ERCO shortly before World War II,” explains Millville-based Brozina. Following the war, several other manufacturers continued its production, he goes on to reveal. “The final model first flew in 1968, while production then ceased in 1970,” adds the Ercoupe expert.

At the aircraft’s original unveiling, it was described as both ‘the world’s safest plane,’ and ‘the future of travel,’ according to New Jersey native Brozina. It was also marketed, he says, as the airplane which anyone could fly.

Affordable, able to be handled much like a family car, and sold by department stores, it became a media sensation. In just one year alone, the Engineering and Research Corporation received over 6,000 orders. Many decades on, the fixed-wing aircraft continues to enjoy a faithful following. “Production of the plane only ended,” Brozina explains, “when the bottom began to drop out of the civil aircraft market.”

It’s estimated that only around 2,000 of the aircraft still exist, with just half of those registered to fly, adding weight to Brozina’s suggestion that the Ercoupe is something of a ‘what is it?’ piece of engineering, despite immense early popularity. “With such a small number still in existence, it’s little wonder that so few pilots today have ever seen one,” adds the Millville, New Jersey-based foreman, pilot, and lifelong aviation enthusiast.

Samuel Brozina acquired his private pilot’s license several years ago and is qualified to fly both so-called tail-dragger aircraft and planes with triangular landing gear. “I’ve always been a fan of World War II warbirds,” reveals the pilot, “however, among civilian aircraft, the Ercoupe has always caught my fancy.”

Brozina’s recent acquisition came from Quakertown, Pennsylvania. “I was able to find a good Ercoupe for sale in Quakertown,” he explains, “around 50 miles north of Philadelphia.”

Since acquiring his new aircraft, Samuel Brozina has had a one-off Ercoupe jacket patch specially designed and manufactured. “Jacket patches and pilots go together, and I’m no exception,” he proudly suggests.

“Now,” Brozina adds, wrapping up, “I’m ready for takeoff!”